Category Archives: resurrection life

[a different calendar] what EASTER means for us today

happy easter!!! the greatest feast day of the christian calendar! in addition to my personal liturgy & daily devotional routines, i am celebrating today by attending early mass at the catholic church down the road [can.not.wait!], worship at my home church [we make a bigger deal out of communion this particular sunday], & a huge lunch with shaun’s colleagues [one of my favorite traditions]. how are you celebrating the risen Christ today?

these thoughts from my book of liturgy challenged me to view easter not just as a day but, as it should be in the christian calendar, a season. i especially love how the authors reframe what our holidays are in terms of God’s kingdom calendar. i hope you are equally blessed by this!

excerpt from common prayer: a liturgy for ordinary radicals:

“As Paul said in the first century, our faith means little if Jesus isn’t risen from the dead. If Advent is our New Year’s and Pentecost is the church’s birthday, Easter is our Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Presidents’ Day all in one. This is when we remember Christ’s sacrifice for our sins, celebrate his victory over the powers of evil, and honor him as our true Commander in Chief.

“Holy Week begins with Jesus’ inaugural parade on Palm Sunday and takes us through the drama of his last week in Jerusalem. In many ways, this is the week that teaches us our rhythm for every week in God’s kingdom. It’s often called ‘passion week,’ because it’s full of suffering. (Passio is Latin for ‘suffering.’) This is one of the harder things to learn about following Jesus: his way to real life isn’t easy. In the end, it’ll get you killed. And most of us don’t want to die. (This is why we have to practice denying ourselves through forty days of Lent, fasting from stuff that we usually enjoy so we can learn to hunger and thirst for God’s kingdom.) . . .

“Resurrection is such a big deal that we don’t just take one day to celebrate it. Every Sunday is resurrection day. But we also set aside fifty days for the Easter season, putting aside our normal fasts and taking extra time to celebrate what God has done in our world. Forty days after Easter, we remember Jesus’ ascension, when he returned to heaven and told the disciples to wait for the Holy Spirit, so they might become his body in the world. The ascension seals the deal for the disciples. (Up to that point, some of them had headed back to their familiar world of fishing and life as usual.) For us it is a reminder that the resurrection isn’t just a miracle that happened two thousand years ago. It’s a way of life we practice. Pentecost ends the Easter season, reminding us that we don’t practice resurrection by our own strength, but have the Holy Spirit’s power among us as a community called church. Jesus’ story is now our story. And the next chapter begins today.”